Dr Tracey Batten

  • Imperial CEO resigns

    The rising pressures on Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust finally took their toll yesterday. Dr Tracey Batten, CEO of the trust with three of the busiest acute hospitals in west London, resigned after the Board meeting in public at Charing Cross yesterday, Wednesday 25th January 2017.

    The timing of this resignation could not be worse, with A&E attendances rising to unmanageable levels, a growing waiting list for surgery both emergency and elective, and a programme of redevelopment at a critical point at St Mary's and in the wider context of the "Shaping a Healthier Future" business plans.

    Dr Batten was brave and honest to allow the BBC full access to Imperial's hospitals over 6 weeks. The documentary series "Hospital" is being broadcast on BBC2 on Wednesdays at 9pm, available later on the i-player.

    The Trust is closely helped by PwC for day-to-day financial management, although we were assured at the Board meeting on Wednesday that it "can pay its bills".

    NW London is one of the 44  NHS "footprints" in the most advanced stages of preparation for the implementation of its "Sustainability and Transformation Plan". It is known to be closely watched by the Department of Health. The pressure of implementing completely unwarranted and impossible cuts has, it is believed, prompted this resignation. We look forward to Imperial acknowledging that the evidence shows increased demand for beds, not for cuts in beds and staff.

    Postscript:  On 6th February Dr Batten informed us that in 6 months she will be going back to spend time with her ageing parents in Australia.

     

     

  • Councils and residents close ranks to fight 'new ploy' to close Ealing and Charing Cross Hospitals

     

     

    Four hundred people came to Hammersmith Town Hall on a cold Tuesday night (29th November) to hear about the fight against NHS proposals which will force the closure of Ealing and Charing Cross Hospitals.

    Health services in the north west of London are already stretched after "Shaping a Healthier Future" (SaHF) plans (2012) resulted in the closure of Hammersmith and Central Middlesex Hospitals’ A&E departments in September 2014. Ealing lost its maternity unit in 2015 and its children's ward last June.

    In June 2016 local authorities in England were being asked to sign up to Sustainability and Transformation Plans ("STPs") but Ealing and Hammersmith and Fulham Councils have refused to do so, saying that this would see the end of their hospitals as major providers of vitally needed blue-light A&Es and acute beds.

    The meeting was chaired by Hammersmith and Fulham Council’s Vivienne Lukey, cabinet member for health and adult social care.

  • Imperial AGM: Charing Cross sell-off vital to avoid ‘disastrous’ PFI deal, insists hospital chairman

     

     
    Sell-off plans: Charing Cross hospital

    Sell-off plans: Charing Cross hospital

     

    At the AGM of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust on Wednesday 24th September at Porchester Hall, Porchester Road W2 starting at 18.00

    The sale of a large part of the Charing Cross hospital site is the only way to avoid using a “disastrous” PFI deal to fund rebuilding plans, campaigners have been told.

    In angry scenes, Sir Richard Sykes, chairman of Imperial College NHS trust, said there was a pressing need to upgrade its sister hospital, St Mary’s, and convert Charing Cross into an outpatient day surgery hospital.

  • Save Our Hospitals to meet Dr Tracey Batten, CEO of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust on Wed 17th September

     


    At the Public Board meeting held on 30th July 2014 "Save Our Hospitals" Chair, Merril Hammer, stood up at the end and made a public invitation to the CEO of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Dr Tracey Batten. She asked Dr Batten to meet with representatives from SOH to hear their concerns and to "engage" with the full range of issues raised by the proposed reorganisation of health services in north-west London, and especially the closure of 4 out of 9 A&E departments in this zone, and the eventual closure of Charing Cross Hospital as an acute hospital, and its replacement with a much small "cottage" hospital.