A & E waiting times week ending 30th November 2014: worst ever!

 

The tone of this e-mail is a little "tongue-in-cheek" - but the statistics quoted are unfortunately all too true.
 

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Date: 5 December 2014 at 17:30
Subject: Worst Again
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Dr Spencer,

 

It is reported that you have gone on the £120,000 junket to America.  I continue to hope not.  Quite what you would have expected to discover there after you spent over £3.5 million on McKinsey's advice for Shaping a 'Healthier' Future it is hard to imagine.  I look forward to a full and costed report of the findings.

 

Many people feel that your time would have been better spent in dealing with the increasing A&E crisis in NW London.  'Crisis' has ceased to be the appropriate word;  it is a catastrophe.

 

It now almost goes without saying that in the week ending 30 November London North West Healthcare was the worst Trust in the country for Type-1 waits at 65.7%, over 5 percentage points worse than the next.   And it was the 14th worst for 'All attendances', out of some 280.

 

And that week the North West London Sector was the worst in the country, if it were taken as an 'Area Team' of its own – which it could easily be, given its size and activity levels.  As you know, there are 25 Teams including London and NW London was 6.9 percentage points lower than the worst of those for Type-1s, at 79.9%.  Against the 95% target for 'All attendances' it was the worst again, managing 91.2% compared with 96.5% for the rest of London.

 

So, instead of swanning off to the States, all you had to do was to talk to your colleagues in London to find out how to run A&E services.  30% of all London Type-1 waits occurred in the area under your supervision.  So, when you said 'We think there are many other factors going on across London,' you failed to point out that you were attracting more than your fair share of whatever you think these might be.

 

There again, I am not aware that any other London Sector has decided to axe 2 of its central A&Es, reduce bed capacity (until the recent frantic reversals) and invite ambulance crews to telephone for an appointment to deliver a casualty to a 'Major Hospital'.

 

Your position is increasingly untenable.

 

Colin Standfield

 
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