Junior Doctors seize PR initiative before all-out strike on 26th and 27th April

Dr Rachel Clarke and Dr Dagan Lonsdale are two campaigning junior doctors. They are tired of Mr Hunt's abandoning talks between the BMA and the Government, and they have set up shop outside Richmond House, the Dept of Health's headquarters in Whitehall, waiting for him to appear and re-start talks:

 

junior-doctors.jpg

 

They have even brought their sleeping bags:

 

Junior doctors sleeping rough outside Whitehall in protest over contracts

 

After 24 hours another pair of junior hospital doctors will take up the relay, for 12 hours per day for 7 days.


As Deeney21 writes under the Independent's article yesterday (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/junior-doctors-begin-permanent-protest-outside-department-of-health-a6981871.html):

 

Those who think this dispute is about greed need to wake up! As a junior doctor myself I can tell you that this is not the vocation of choice if making money is towards the top of your career wish list. Almost all junior doctors will have got top marks in their A levels – if they were concerned with money a career in the city/law/dentistry would have been a much smarter choice. To further reinforce this point if a junior doctor realised after completing med school that money was a major driver for him they would go and work for a pharmaceutical company (after completing the first two foundation years) rather than stay working in the NHS. Thirdly, although for various reasons it is seldom publicly said, it is the opinion of many junior doctors (and many others!) that this whole dispute and contract is part of a longer term Tory strategy to bring the NHS to its knees, enabling the Govt to justify privatization. If doctors were greedy, we would be looking forward to the day when this happens because private hospitals pay significantly better than the NHS (look how much doctors in the US are paid!)

 

One criticism below says that we are striking over “pay and conditions” rather than “patient safety”. The issue here is that the two are not mutually exclusive – if the safeguards to stop us from being overworked are removed, as they are in the imposed contract, we will be made to work even longer hours which is obviously not at all good for patient safety! (I am currently in the middle of doing 7 X 12.5 night shifts back-to-back and that is allowed under the existing contract. I don't like to think what would happen if the rota coordinators were given the ability to make shift patterns even worse).

Sorry for the long post but it's frustrating to read such comments as they are inaccurate and very unfair. I hope that the public are smart enough to realise that we are striking both for ourselves in the short term and for our patients (everyone in England) in both the short and long term. The NHS is in serious danger right now – please support the junior doctors.

Those who think this dispute is about greed need to wake up! As a junior doctor myself i can tell you that this is not the vocation of choice if making money is towards the top of your career wish list. Almost all junior doctors will have got top marks in their a levels - if they were concerned with money, a career in the city/in law/dentistry etc. would have been a much smarter choice. To further reinforce this point, if a junior doctor realised that after completing med school that money was a major driver for them, they would go and work for a pharmaceutical company (after completing the first two foundation years) rather than stay working in the nhs. Thirdly, although for various reasons it is seldom publicly said, it is the opinion of many junior doctors (and many others!) that this whole dispute and contract is part of a longer-term tory strategy to bring the nhs to it's knees - enabling the govt to justify privitisation. If doctors were greedy, we would be looking forward to the day that this happens because private hospitals pay significantly better than the nhs (look how much doctors in the US are paid!) 
One criticism below says that we are 'striking over pay and conditions' rather than 'patient safety'. The issue here is that the two are not mutually exclusive - if the safeguards to stop us from being overworked are removed, as they are in the imposed contract, we will be made to work even longer hours which is obviously not at all good for patient safety! 
(I am currently in the middle of doing 7 X 12.5 night shifts back-to-back and that is allowed under the existing contract. I dont like to think about what could happen in the rota coordinators were given the ability to make the shift patterns even worse).
Sorry for the long post but it's frustrating to read such comments as they inaccurate and very unfair. I hope the public are smart enough to realise that we are striking both for ourselves in the short-term, and for patients (everyone in england) in both the short and long term. The nhs is in serious danger right now - please support the junior doctors
Those who think this dispute is about greed need to wake up! As a junior doctor myself i can tell you that this is not the vocation of choice if making money is towards the top of your career wish list. Almost all junior doctors will have got top marks in their a levels - if they were concerned with money, a career in the city/in law/dentistry etc. would have been a much smarter choice. To further reinforce this point, if a junior doctor realised that after completing med school that money was a major driver for them, they would go and work for a pharmaceutical company (after completing the first two foundation years) rather than stay working in the nhs. Thirdly, although for various reasons it is seldom publicly said, it is the opinion of many junior doctors (and many others!) that this whole dispute and contract is part of a longer-term tory strategy to bring the nhs to it's knees - enabling the govt to justify privitisation. If doctors were greedy, we would be looking forward to the day that this happens because private hospitals pay significantly better than the nhs (look how much doctors in the US are paid!) 
One criticism below says that we are 'striking over pay and conditions' rather than 'patient safety'. The issue here is that the two are not mutually exclusive - if the safeguards to stop us from being overworked are removed, as they are in the imposed contract, we will be made to work even longer hours which is obviously not at all good for patient safety! 
(I am currently in the middle of doing 7 X 12.5 night shifts back-to-back and that is allowed under the existing contract. I dont like to think about what could happen in the rota coordinators were given the ability to make the shift patterns even worse).
Sorry for the long post but it's frustrating to read such comments as they inaccurate and very unfair. I hope the public are smart enough to realise that we are striking both for ourselves in the short-term, and for patients (everyone in england) in both the short and long term. The nhs is in serious danger right now - please support the junior doctors